Raspberry Berliner Weisse

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One of my favorite summertime drinks is a nice, crisp, tart Berliner Weisse. It’s a German sour wheat beer, really doesn’t have a lot of complexity in terms of taste, but by god is it good on a hot summer day. It’s usually brewed with a split of wheat and pilsner malt, and then soured using lactobacillus cultures. The result is a light crisp beer, coming in around 3%, with a good wheat flavor, and a yogurt / citrus like tartness. Simplicity at its best. It’s also a quick style to brew as well since typically its either not boiled or it has a short boil.

For my version I wanted to make a beer that was a little stronger and I really wanted the wheat to come through since I love that about this style. I also wanted to add some raspberries!

Recipe
Brew Date – 12/19/2015
Batch Size (Gal) 3
Total Grain (Lbs) 6.5lb
OG 1.052
Anticipated IBU 3.5
Wort Boil Time 20 Minutes
Efficiency 70%

Grain
3.25lbs    50%   Pilsner
3.25lb     50%    Flaked Wheat
Hops
0.2oz Hallertau

Yeast
Omega Yeast Lacto Blend
Finished with bottle dregs from Transient Solarium Gose

Mash Schedule
Sacch Rest 60 minutes at 154F

The only problem that I ran into is that my efficiency was much higher than normal, I was only getting about a 60% efficiency for a lot of brew sessions and for this one I got closer to 70%, which was great! However this meant that it was going to be a stronger beer. Looking back I almost wonder if I should have just added additional water, but oh well.

After boiling for 20 minutes and cooling to about 100 degrees Fahrenheit, I pitched the lacto blend and let that sour for 1 month. After a month, I then added 6lbs raspberries from Oregon Fruit, and dreggs from the delicious Transient Solarium Gose. I wanted to make sure some sach strain was in the beer, as well as any additional thing that could of been in the dreggs. I figured it would add “complexity”. This then fermented for an additional 2 months and then bottled to 4oz carbonation!

The result was a light pink colored beer, with some tart seediness from the raspberries. The next post I’ll be sure to do a full tasting of the Raspberry Berliner!

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